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and at the capitol flying at half staff today in memory of the united states ambassador, christopher stevens, and three other americans killed last night at the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya. president obama has ordered that flags fly at half staff across the united states and at embassies around the world until sunday night. >>> i'm wolf blitzer in for piers morgan. earlier today the republican challenger, mitt romney, blasted president obama for what he characterized as, quote, an apology for america's values over the storming of the u.s. embassy in cairo. >> an apology for america's values is never the right course. >> the president fired right back in an interview tonight with cbs news. >> governor romney seems to have a tendency to shoot first and name later, and as president, one of the things i've learned is you can't do that. you know, it's important for you to make sure that the statements that you make are backed up by the facts and that you've thought through the ramifications before you make them. >> and there are late-breaking developments right now. two u.s. navy warships o
. a shocking death. a united states ambassador in libya dead today. the obama administration taking steps now this hour to beef up security at embassies around the world. after this veteran diplomat christopher stevens along with three of his american staffers were murdered by a mob in benghazi, libya. the attack yesterday was apparently triggered by a film, a film produced by an american by the name of sam basil. considered by many to be highly offensive to islam. again, a film. these murders taking place in a country that the united states helped to liberate from the dictator moammar gadhafi and a mob attacked the embassy in cairo, egypt, yesterday. climbing the embassy walls. tearing down and ripping apart the united states flag. it's unclear if the attacks were koord natded or plans to con side with the 11th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks here in america. but moments ago, our president obama spoke out about these killings. >> the united states condemns in the strongest terms this outrageous and shocking attack. we're working with the government of libya to secure our diplomats. i've alwa
in the united states and said to be insulting to islam. >>> u.s. drones join the manhunt for those who killed a u.s. diplomat and three other americans. concerns over the tep id response by the new regime in egypt. >> i don't think that we would consider them an ally, but we don't consider them an enemy. >> we're covering every angle of this developing story. first, let's take a step back and look at how things have unfolded over the past 48 hours. the outrage first ignited tuesday in egypt. protesters converged on the embassy. within hours, crowds gathered outside benghazi, libya. armed militants killed the u.s. ambassador and three of the staffers. today, crowds storm the u.s. embassy in yemen. riot police eventually turned them back with tear gas. also today, demonstrators turn out in iran. they aamass outside the swiss embassy, which represents u.s. interests in iran. let's get the latest now from that region. mohammed jamjoon join us. >> about 2,000 to 3,000 protesters that were marching toward the u.s. embassy, many of them aable to get close enough to the main gates. they started scali
that the united states had nothing to do with the youtube video that seems to have sparked the violent protests. >> this video is disgusting and reprehensible. it appears to have a deeply cynical purpose, to denigrate a great religion and to provoke rage. but as i said yesterday, there is no justification, none at all, for responding to this video with violence. we condemn the violence that has resulted in the strongest terms. >> egypt is where the latest violence against the u.s. started. egypt may be where the u.s. faces its biggest challenges. you've got angry crowds protesting for a third day over a film that insults islam. now, demonstrates threw mocks and molotov cocktails, pushed through the barbed wire fencing outside the embassy in cairo. police responded by firing tear gas. ian lee is join ugs from the egyptian capital. ian, this is three days with these kind of demonstrations. first of all, do we expect that on friday, a day of prayer, it's going to be much, much bigger and more violent? >> reporter: well, it's definitely going to be a lot bigger. the muslim brotherhood is calling fo
it because he loved the work. he really thought the mission of the united states to help these fragile countries move ahead, start anew, that's what he really loved about libya. from the time that he was working to restore ties with the libyan government to being an envoy to the opposition and helping the rebels on the ground in bengzi, to now becoming the u.s. ambassador to libya, he really was someone that felt it was really important to kind of -- the democratic values and need to build proper institutions and try and have a peaceful stable country. >> we understand that he was really regarded in some ways as a hero to the rebels and the people in benghazi in particular. how did he feel? how comfortable did he feel moving around in libya? >> he felt very comfortable. that's what a lot of people are talking about today that maybe he felt a little too comfortable. chris was someone that felt very at ease in benghazi. he knew the area well. he knew the country well. so he might have not -- he might have felt a little bit more immune than some other people would to his safety because he
of days ago, president obama said egypt was not exactly the united states' ally, but it wasn't its enemy either. did those words have anything to do with this? >> reporter: i think there is a certain amount of alarm among the leadership of the muslim brotherhood. those i'vepoken with did seem to get the message, that the united states was unhappy with the response or the reaction of mohammed morsi, the egyptian president, to the breaching of the american embassy. they felt that maybe it's time to start sending out a more reassuring messages to the united states. but what's significant is that on the one hand the message is come i coming out in english to a nonarabic audience, seemed to be pointing in the direction of reconciliation. i was at a demonstration this morning at a mosque not in the tahrir square area where it was organized by the muslim brotherhood. and the chants were not reassuring. one of the chants was "obama there are a million osamas." referring, of course, to osama bin laden, be chanting that united states is the enemy of god. it appears that the muslim brotherhood is t
, and this is why there is outrage toward the united states government. is -- or the united states, because protesters are blaming the u.s. for allowing this video to come out and they are saying the u.s. is accountable and responsible for the fact that they allowed a video like this to go out there and to be spread out there. so that's why these protesters are -- are definitely angry and directing their anger toward the united states. >> mona, being in cairo, why do you think that's happening now? who benefits? >> reporter: that's a great question. we're in a stage where the revolution that began last year for freedoms of all kinds is still very much not completed and a big concern for many in egypt today is that these terrible events will be used by the government to justify a return to emergency law. we still don't have a constitution in egypt, we don't have a parliament. our president and prime minister missing all day. they have made no official statements. you basically have a fringe element that claims to represent us, and it doesn't, on a day and a time when egyptians are still very
have been telling us that for months now they've been warning the united states about this growing extremist threat and that they have been growing ever more concerned about how little control they actually themselves have over the situation. >> arwa, please be careful over there in benghazi. we'll stay in close touch. arwa damon, one of our courageous journalists. the egyptian capital is tense, the u.s. embassy is tense. ben wedeman, what's going on now? are they out in tahrir square? >> at the moment it's gone relatively quiet. ta tahrir square looks normal, given it's 3:00 a.m.. in the streets below me, just a few protesters milling around. we haven't heard the bang of tear gas being fired by the security forces. this day could have been much worse in egypt. the muslim brotherhood had called for nationwide protests against this offensive youtube video that sparked this crisis, but at the last moment they cancelled those protests. so really we've seen a small protest outside the u.s. consulate in alexandria. here in cairo the numbers are down. it's important to keep in mind there
in the globe? >> well, suzanne, this is obviously a tragic day for the united states and for the u.s. foreign service. ambassador stevens and his three colleagues were serving our country in the most honorable way. they were out on the frontlines, and it does demonstrate that we have men and women fro the u.s. foreign service from our state department all over the world defending us every single day and so obviously the first thing we have to say today is our hearts go out to their loved ones and their families. it's a tragic day for all americans because this attack came on september 11th, 11 years after that terrible day in american history. >> nick, how do we answer secretary clinton's question when she took -- takes a look at the diplomatic mission and says, you know, we put so much into libya to turn around to have something like this happen? she clearly is trying to say that there is something that we have done that is worth all of this effort, but when you look at what has happened, how much of that is an insult, is a slap to the u.s. people? >> well, you know, suzanne, i really though
to you. i wish to greet all of the wonderful people of the united states and all of the people who will see your program. at the end of the day, if you do have personal animosity towards me, don't transfer that on to the rest of the people of the united states. we love the people of the united states and they also wish in return peace and stability for all of the world. >> you've come here to make a speech to the united nations. many are saying it's the most important speech of your life. do you feel that? >> translator: no. this is not the most important speech of my life, but i do believe that every moment of a human being's life are the most important for that human being, because they will not come back. if you lose today, today's gone for good. one day of your life is gone. therefore, every moment counts, every moment is important. i have been coming to the united nations general assembly for eight years now, seeking progress and friendly relations with all nations, and the objective is still the same. >> the reason that people think it's so important is that they believe that
of the united states in our region encourages extremism. >> surprising. how would you feel if one of your children dated a jew? and heated. especially when i asked him about basic human rights for gays. >> do you really believe that someone is born homosexual? >> yes, i absolutely believe that. yes. >> i'm sorry. let me ask you this. do you believe that anyone has given birth through homosexuality? homosexuality ceases procreation. >>> good evening. welcome to a special edition of "piers morgan tonight." looking live at new york city, home of the united nations. world leaders from 193 countries are gathering for the annual meeting of the general assembly. president mahmoud ahmadinejad will address the meeting on wednesday. he had blistering words at israel today. more on that in a moment. he took aim at the security council on the subject of iran's nuclear program. >> translator: we have business that some members of the security council with little rights have chosen silence with regard to the nuclear warheads of the fake regime while at the same time they impede scientific progress of o
there simply as a diversion. four americans died including the united states ambassador to libya chris stevens. our foreign affairs correspondent, jill dougherty, has been working her sources to get a better idea on exactly what happened. our senior international correspondent nic robertson is monitoring the search for who's responsible. and our pentagon correspondent chris lawrence is keeping tabs on the u.s. military's response to what's going on as well. let's go to jill first. she's watching what's going on. jill, what's the latest over at the state department beyond the heartbreak of a top u.s. diplomat, three others killed? >> right, wolf. just in a few minutes we're expecting an update, a briefing on background by senior officials here at the state department. but for now this is what we know based on the conversations and what we are hearing from u.s. officials. tuesday night at the u.s. consulate in benghazi, a complex and highly dangerous situation. outside an anti-american protest. then a group of heavily armed militants, approximately two dozen of them, launched an attack firing ro
and the united states. the united states has sard, i'm not going to let iran get the bomb. the president said, if they go assemble a nuclear weapon, that is a red line for me. president netanyahu says iran cannot have the no-how and technology. that's a red line for him. it's a difference of opinion. the prime minister is looking for the president to inch up on that line. i think the president made it clear he's not going to tolerate iran with a nuclear weapon. he dubt want to give iran wiggle room. doesn't want to show iran how far it has to go. >> you talk about setting a red line. you're talking about a potential strike or something militarily. that clearly raises a whole different set of discussions. the president also talked about the violent protests in arab countries over what he described at the crude and disgusting antimuslim video. what was the message he was trying to send to countries trying to move forward after the arab spring revolutions? >> he was trying to do a couple of things. on one hand, trying to say this violence is not the answer. clearly, the united states does not be
. and good morning to you. i wish to greet all of the worndful people of the united states and all of the people who will see your program. at the end of the day, if you do have personal animosity towards me, don't transfer that on to the rest of the people of the united states. we love the people of the united states, and they also wish in return peace and stability for all of the world. >> the big catalyst for protests at the moment in the middle east was the video that was released which mocked the prophet muhammad. as a result, there was an attack as you know on the american embassy in benghazi, lib, the ambassador christopher stevens was murdered. do you condemn the attacking which caused his murder? >> translator: fundamentally, first of all, any action that is provocative offends the religious thoughts and feelings of any people we condemn. likewi likewise, we condemn any type of extremism. of course, what took place was ugly, offending the holy prophet is quite ugly. this has very little or nothing to do with freedom and freedom of speech. this is the weakness and the abuse
different images here, offering comfort to the families, saying that the united states despite the images of violence will remain engaged around the world, that justice will be done. but also in the case of each of these men, making the point that they essentially fell on a battlefield, in service of the country, and in service of their friends. and, of course, this is what the fallen do, don't they? you learn so many times through the years that when men and women fight in battle, they fight for each other. and these men were fighting for libya, they were fighting for the people of libya, and the president, i think, made it very clear in his message, he wanted to sound that theme, that they served for a reason for this country and for countries around the world, that this is the symbol of u.s. diplomacy. >> barbara, let's listen to that now. >> four americans, four patriots, they loved this country and they chose to serve it and served it well. they had a mission, and they believed in it. they knew the danger, and they accepted it. they didn't simply embrace the american ideal, they live
. >> "outfront" now protests spreading around the world all directed at the united states and we're learning more about the film and filmmaker at the center of the outrage. plus some progress in finding those responsible for the death of the american ambassador to libya, let's go "outfront". >>> good evening i'm erin burnett. "outfront" tonight turmoil spreading. protesters rising up in at least nine middle eastern countries today their target the united states. this is cairo tonight. you're looking at pictures here as you can see flames, molotov cocktails, hundreds of angry protesters amassed outside of the american embassy. security forces fired tear gas and rubber bullets to hold them out. even canada out of caution closed their embassy in cairo. a photo cairo, it's a chalk drawing on the ground of a jewish star of david with the words, i'll translate, remember your black day september 11th within in arabic. and it is beyond cairo tonight. anti-u.s. demonstrators clashed in front of u.s. embassies, in israel, sudan, iraq, iran and among muslims in kashmir. there's a call in iran for nationwide
square. welcome to all of you around the united states and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria. we have at important story for you today. we'll talk to wolfowitz and others. next up, michael lewis spent eight months in the white house with unprecedented access to president obama. we'll talk about who obama is and how he makes decisions. also, why is israel trying to get the united states to commit to waging war when israel itself isn't willing to do so. and finally we'll take a look at these pictures. do you think they were taken by nasa or the european space agency? no, a teenager with a second-hand camera. >>> but first here's my take. the images of the american embassy burning in benghazi might have conjured up memories of tehran in 1979,but the analogy is false. in libya, the government is not fomenting anti-americanism. it's lamb meanting it. the violence there appears to have been the work of small extremist elements that lack much popular support. but the storm has spread from libya. across the middle east there have been protests rallying against the united states and the west i
. protesters rising up in at least nine middle eastern countries today their target the united states. this is cairo tonight. you're looking at pictures here as you can see flames, molotov cocktails, hundreds of angry protesters amassed outside of the american embassy. security forces fired tear gas and rubber bullets to hold them back. even canada out of caution closed their embassy in cairo. a photo cairo, it's a chalk drawing on the ground of a jewish star of david with the words, i'll translate, remember your black day september 11th within in arabic. and it is beyond cairo tonight. anti-u.s. demonstrators clashed in front of u.s. embassies, in israel, sudan, iraq, iran and among muslims in kashmir. there's a call in iran for nationwide rallies tomorrow. it appears to be a backlash at least in part from a low budget anti-islamic film which was made in the united states, first posted on youtube in july and recently publicized in the middle east. here's what we're also learning tonight. federal officials say the filmmaker's name is nakoula basseley nakoula. the fbi says the agent ha
square. welcome to all of you in the united states and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria. today, mahmoud ahmadinejad, the president of iran. why he doesn't fear israeli attack, why he feels they would prevail in any war and his surprising apology to the people of new york. also on the show, bain capital. mitt romney's private he can quit firm is no longer so private, it is in the headlines, on the campaign trail, on your tv screen. what is it really all about? steve pagliuca one of those that runs the firm joins me. >>> just when we need it most. what is it? i'll explain. >>> and, finally, candidate barack obama of brazil? but first here's my take. president obama has sewed up the -- surged in the polls this week, and republicans have been quick to figure out the problem. mitt romney. peggy noonan said his rolling campaign has been a calamity. shouldn't it puz puzzle us that romney's campaign is so incompetent, given his reputation for, well, competence. after all he founded one of the leading firms, turned around the salt lake city olympics and was a very successful governor. h
>>> this is "gps," the "global public square." welcome to all of you in the united states and around the world, i'm fareed zakaria. we have a smart show for you today. we'll talk mostly about what else has been going on in the world outside of the democratic national convention. >>> things have heated up with regard to iran and israel, with syria, with afghanistan. i've got a great panel to discuss all of it. anne-marie slaughter, richard haass, martin indyk. >>> then, a different spin on a familiar question in the presidential campaign. will americans be better off four years from now? one of the world's top bankers, roger altman, thinks so. harvard's niall ferguson isn't so sure. >>> next up, can't we just predict the election results now and be done with it? i'll ask nate silver, "the new york times'" brilliant statistician. >>> also, the crisis you don't know enough about that could have a big impact around the globe. >>> first, here's my take. both conventions are done, and what can we say about the upcoming campaign and election? well, one hearty prediction about ele
notwithstanding, there was not a clear cut warning of a strike in the united states about to happen. >> well, august 6 is most certainly an historical document that says here's how you might think about al qaeda. a warning is when you have something that suggests that an attack is impending. and we did not have, on the united states, threat information that was in any way specific enough to suggest that something was coming in the united states. >> former secretary of state and national security adviser condoleezza rice there. kirk eikenwald concedes her argument is plausible, but says he's seen portions of many security briefs and come to an inescapable conclusion that administration's reaction that mr. bush was told -- those were his words. we have not seen what he says he's seen. he joins us shortly to talk about it. we do know from the report of the 9/11 commission that there were 40 other mentions of osama bin laden and al qaeda in presidential daily briefs prior to 9/11. but he goes further than that and reports direct warnings about the al qaeda attacking the u.s. began in the spring
. >> protesters rage against the united states and an inflammatory muslim film. an interview with al qaeda's leader. >> with only 52 days to go before the election. we want to welcome our viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm wolf blitzer, you're in "the situation room." >> violent protests across the muslim world this week, sparked by a low budget movie by a mystery film maker. the u.s. embassies found themselves under attack by outraged mobs and in some cases forces fired on mobs with deadly consequences and all of it caused a dramatic shift in the presidential campaign as foreign policy suddenly took center stage. ben wedeman is back in cairo. it seems that this weekend there seems to be a cooling of heads to a certain degree in egypt. is that what you're seeing, ben? >> certainly among the leaders of the muslim brotherhood and in the administration of the egyptian president, there is an attempt to calm down the situation rhetorically. and certainly we've seen in messages conveyed by leaders of the muslim brotherhood and the egyptian president, they're trying to send a
before them, and that's something i think we should discuss in the united states. >> let me read you something i know you're probably quite familiar with. for our viewers, something the president has said repeatedly. this he said at the beginning of the year. as president of the united states i don't bluff. i think both the iranian and the israeli governments recognize that when the united states says it is unacceptable for iran to have a nuclear weapon, we mean what we say. do you disagree with that? >> i think that when he says that implicitly is that he will stop them before they have a nuclear weapon, which means they'll draw red lines. i think it's important to communicate it. i wouldn't bet -- i wouldn't bet the security of the world and my own country's future from a country that threatens our annihilation and murders civilians en masse in syria and brutalizes its own people. i wouldn't bet the future on intelligence for simple reasons. american intelligence and israeli intelligence that cooperate together. that wonderful success about saving lives and alerting the people, and
in cairo issued a statement that seemed to apologize for anti-muslim activity in the united states. that prompted the white house to quickly release another statement through an administration official saying that cairo embassy remarks were, quote, not cleared. secretary of clinton issued her own statement, condemning the attacks under the strongest possible terms, but that was not quick enough for the romney camp to blasted the obama saying it's disgraceful that the obama administration's first response was not to condemn attacks on our diplomatic missions. and then from the obama campaign, we are shocked that at a time when the united states of america is confronting the tragic death of one of our diplomatic officers in libya, governor romney would choose to launch a political attack. end quote. newt gingrich appeared on cnn this morning and blasted president obama. >> when the american flag was torn down and destroyed, an american ambasdor and three other americans are killed, my reaction is not to be pleasant and caring of those tearing down our flag and insulting o iassau coun
right now after the killing of the united states ambassador in libya. so how dangerous is it now for americans abroad? also, as the u.s. moves to hunt down the killers, libyan authorities make at least one arrest. but was it a mob attack or something much more ominous? >>> and mitt romney's taking heat even from some republicans for his harsh criticism of president obama's foreign policy. is he ready to dial back or double down again? i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> u.s. warships are moving toward libya today as president obama vows that no act of terror will go unpunished. his words. but in the grim aftermath of the u.s. consulate attack in libya which left the u.s. ambassador and three other americans dead, there are still serious questions as to which group was responsible. meantime, violent protests sparked by an anti-islamic film spreading across the muslim world today. in cairo, crowds have again gathered outside the u.s. embassy right now. they've been throwing rocks and fire bombs as police answer with tear gas. in yemen, police open fire to disperse
the mourners as the bodies of the u.s. ambassador and others killed in libya return to the united states. and mitt romney ramps up his criticism of the president again as the latest polls show him falling behind in several crucial states. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> but we begin with these live pictures. look at this. this is tahrir square in cairo. these are live pictures coming in not far from the united states embassy. once again, the protests escalating even as we speak. earlier in the day it had been relatively -- keyword, relatively, quiet. now seems to be escalating for some reason. our own ben wedeman is on the ground for us. we're going to be going to him shortly. at the same time as these scenes are unfolding, there also have been frightening scenes of violence and hatred directed at the united states and others around the region. it's spreading. and u.s. officials are very worried. sources tell me they're especially concerned about today's penetration of the united states embassy in tunisia and the reports that the american school was actually burned.
-u.s. protests in cairo. the secretary of state hillary clinton has denounced the violence against the united states. >> but as i said yesterday, there is no justification, none at all, for responding to this video with violence. we condemn the violence that has resulted in the strongest terms. >> let's turn now to cnn's ben wedeman in cairo. 224 people injured so far? >> reporter: yes. that's right. and in fact, the number is probably likely to rise. right now, i'm hearing a lot of shouting and there were just a moment ago a lot of teargas being fired in the street. right next to the american embassy. and this is really been going on all day long. and what we have seen in the last hour is that the security forces have pulled back closer to the area immediately around the american embassy. now, we had a chance to speak with some of those protest earls. many of them blaming directly president obama for this current uproar. >> translator: our demand is that president barack obama appears and makes an official apology to all islamic nations. that is our right. we also want the tape burned and al
, the united states of america will never retreat from the world. >> four people have been arrested in libya what were on the scene of the attack, but the government says they are not linked to the murders. that investigation continues and we have a live report on that now. arwa damon is with me from benghazi tonight and i know you had a chance to go to the consulate there. what did you see? >> reporter: it was really quite chilling, horrifying to be walking through some of the buildings there just imagining what had transpired, taken place. they were all burnt. there was black soot covering the walls. ashes over some of the furniture, the chandeliers. there was debris all over the floor. looters also had moved in after the attack took place pillaging this compound that even after the assault was not really secured but one would have anticipated it to be so given how much evidence was on sight. in fact kitchen, there were bits of made to eat meals, various other cakes sort of strewn about. pieces of paper, one reading across it, libya is so important. while we were there, we also saw libya's
always have to ask yourself, is the united states and the national security better if we're gone completely or have a sphere of influence there? i do believe it ought to be leverage as we move forward and we have to get some commitments by this government that they're going to do more in sinai, less to provoke israel and make sure our u.s. embassies are protected fully by the egyptian government. it's unconscionable this could happen on their watch. so it needs to be a point of discussion. we need to be careful about starting to pull out of places that we don't understand the changes that are happening and we don't understand the intelligence and military roles yet and what this muslim brotherhood is trying to do. we should walk into that decision, not run into it. >> speaking of israel, what do you make of this decision the white house telling the israeli government, prime minister netanyahu coming to the united states that the president won't be able to meet with him because of scheduling conflicts. this comes at a time of tension between the u.s. and israel over iran and its n
the united states. you must be tired. you sit, i'll talk. you listen. and so i did. then he said this. and he repeated it again and again. where is american leadership? we need american leadership. where is american leadership? then he'd talk about a region of the world and what was happening in that region. then he'd say where is american leadership? then he'd go to another region and talk about the challenges there. where is american leadership? the world has always looked to us as the shining city on the hill. that light looks dimmer. we keep kicking the challenges down the road and hope someone else will deal with it. that time is now ours. this is the greatest generation that left us this nation so prosperous and so free. now it's our turn. they've held the torch alost for the whole world to see. a torch of freedom, opportunity and hope. they're getting fewer and further between, the greatest generation. they can't hold it quite as high as they used to. it's our turn to grab the torch. when i became president -- [ cheers and applause ] -- we're going to do what we have to do, we're going
, the united states is falling behind those countries. he said that the united states needs to be doing better than europe. that's one of his big go-to lines. europe is not working for europe. it isn't going to work here in the united states. so these two campaigns are going to be going at it over the economy. we heard president obama throw out a very attack line talking about the mother jones video that came out. he said in front of that crowd, he said when i look out at this crowd i don't see a lot of victims, referring to what mitt romney said in that hidden camera video. they're talking about defense stuff. but the economy looming o everything else. >> thank you, jim. appreciate it as always. president obama and mitt romney face to face. first presidential debate wednesday night. watch it live, 7:00 eastern or cnn.com. >>> also another huge story that has everybody talking. no kidding. the nfl and its refs. right now nfl commissioner roger goodell is taking questions at a presser in new york. let's see what he's got to say. >> -- and on their side why, and if there was a problem with full-
of pressure when it comes to this. not only from the united states, but also from its own people. now, whether these people that are detained are really involved in the attack or have links to this extremist group is something that we'll have to see and see what kind of reaction we see from the extremists too. >> do we have any idea if they're related or affirmative actionated with al qaeda? there's a lot of talk about that yesterday, the possibility that that was the organization. >> not much has been revealed by the government by this group, but what we do know, suzanne, is this is not an isolated incident. over the past few months we have seen an uptick in similar attacks targeting western interests. the u.s. consulate itself was targeted in an attack back in june when a bomb detonated outside the embassy. those attacks taken place in benghazi was targeted by a extremist group, it was called the brigades. this is a true al qaeda group. we also do know that there are groups with links direct links to al qaeda that operate in the eastern part of the country. >> what is the security situation
of the united states, speaking directly to them with their faces, their words coming out and saying this was not u.s. government policy. that's the truth. >> i think it's not an apology. let's talk about how the people in the united states may feel. you know the people there well, but many people in the u.s. don't understand why a cheap internet movie that was made here in the u.s., not in pakistan, not -- how would you explain this cultural divide? >> we take very personally the importance of our protections for free speech, but in pakistan and elsewhere in the world it's beyond the law. it's beyond a constitutional. they are -- i have always found -- i have served for many muslim countries, muslim majority countries, and i have found the people to be very gracious, very welcoming, very accepting of my differences as a foreigner, and they expect and would like to be shown greater respect, and they find that this kind of video is highly disrespectful of them and it's offensive. now, that does not, as it did in libya, in any way excuse the violence or taking of civilian lives, the bu
shakes the resolve of the united states of america. >> secretary of state, hillary clinton, tonight paid tribute to the two security personnel killed alongside ambassador chris stevens. tyrone wood and glen dougherty. she said, this violence should shock people of all faiths and traditions. people of conscience and good will every we are must stand together against violence, hate and division. we have two reporters covering this story for us. arwa damon is in tripoli. ben wedeman is in cairo. let me go to arwa. you are in benghazi for us right now. what's the scene like there? >> well, everyone we have been speaking to and i literally just landed here two hours ago, is incredibly distraught of what took place. they are in utter shock and want to make clear how anguished they are over what transpired. they want the world to know, this is not libya or an action that was supported by the vast majority of libyans. this most certainly is not why they want revolution. many of them reiterated against the fact that they expect them to the united states to nato for their aid. that being said, all
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